Associate Members - Naval, Maritime and Military Organizations

HNSA Associate Members are organizations whose objectives are compatible with the objectives of the Historic Naval Ships Association. Examples are historic ships not yet open to the public, firms who supply goods and services to Fleet Members, for-profit tourist attractions such as ship excursion lines, and non-profit organizations working to obtain historic naval ships for siting and display as museum vessels.

HNSA encourages its Fleet Members to give preference to the products and services offered by its Associate Member vendors and suppliers. It also advises Fleet Members to make their own decisions regarding the purchase, employment or other use of the products and services offered by its Associate Members. HNSA incurs no liability and assumes no responsibility for problems that may occur prior to, during or after an Associate Member has supplied a product or performed a service in support of a Fleet Member.

If you are interested in becoming an associate member, contact Dr. William Cogar at executivedirector@hnsa.org


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Surface Navy Association
6551 Loisdale Court, Suite 222
Springfield, VA 22154
Email: navysna@aol.com
1-800-NAVYSNA
http://www.navysna.org
Capt. David Lee, USN (Ret.), Secretary

This organization promotes coordination and communication among those in the military, business and academic communities who share a common interest in Naval Surface Warfare; and it supports the activities of Surface Naval Forces.

The Surface Navy Association (SNA) was incorporated in 1985 to promote greater coordination and communication among those in the military, business and academic communities who share a common interest in Naval Surface Warfare and to support the activities of Surface Naval Forces. The Association’s first elected President, Vice Admiral Robert L. Walters, presided over the first board meeting in January, 1987.  In an effort to expand the communication and education goals of the Association, an annual symposium and convention was begun in 1988.

MISSION: We are an Association at the center of Surface Warfare that provides for its members support, programs and activities which enable professional growth, personal satisfaction and camaraderie.

PURPOSE: To promote recognition of the role of the Navy and Surface Forces in United States’ security.

To recognize and publicize professional excellence in Surface Naval Forces.
To deal with the challenges in the role of Naval Forces in national security.
To promote liaison and communication among military, academic and business communities.
To foster and preserve the heritage of the Surface Naval Forces in the United States Navy.
To provide forums on professional matters affecting Surface Naval Forces and the United States Navy.

NMASF_logo_Circle_Final

Ronald E. Lanz, ACPA
Executive Director
The National Museum of the American Sailor Foundation
610 Farragut Avenue, Bldg. 42,
Great Lakes, IL 60088
847.574.2223

The National Museum of the American Sailor (NMAS) celebrates the history of the United States Navy’s enlisted Sailor. This museum, which will be located near the Naval Station Great Lakes in North Chicago, Illinois, honors the American Sailor’s unwavering and patriotic allegiance to those three bedrock principles which have guided this nation’s sailors since the earliest days of the naval service: Honor, Courage, Commitment.

As an official Department of the Navy Museum under the Naval History and Heritage Command, the National Museum of the American Sailor’s mission is to collect, preserve, and interpret the history of the United States Navy’s Enlisted Sailor for the benefit of the United States Navy and the people of the United States.

The National Museum of the American Sailor aspires to preserve, educate and celebrate the history of the American Sailor and how through their dedication, patriotism and self-sacrifice, they have protected the United States and its citizens from the late eighteenth century to the present. The museum seeks to make the history of the Enlisted Sailor relevant to Navy personnel and local and national audiences.

2500 Post Road
Warwick, RI 02886-2244
(401) 463-3570
Matthew S. Schulte, Executive Director
mschulte@sshsa.org
http://www.sshsa.org/

The Steamship Historical Society of America records, preserves, and disseminates the history of engine powered vessels. The Steamship Historical Society of America is a non-profit organization with a worldwide membership base. They strive to be the most comprehensive power ship history resource for education, information, and research purposes.

MISSION: The mission of the Steamship Historical Society of America is to record, preserve, and disseminate the history of engine-powered vessels.

What Makes SSHSA Different?: In 1935 seven steamship historians and collectors formed the Steamship Historical Society of America as a means of bringing together amateur and professional historians interested in the history and development of steam navigation, past and present.

Today SSHSA stewards a collection of hundreds of thousands of images, artifacts, periodicals, artwork, official records, memorabilia, and ephemera archived in more than 100 collections and devoted exclusively to the history of engine-powered vessels, their passengers and crew.  SSHSA also publishes the quarterly magazine PowerShips and has taken on the role of conservationist through our digital conservation project, the Image Porthole.

Our members include maritime collectors and artists, current and former crew members, historians and students, genealogists, scuba divers, cruise travelers, ship engineers and architects, and maritime history enthusiasts.

SSHSA holds non-profit 501(c)3 tax-exempt status and remains the oldest and largest organization of its kind in the world. SSHSA is a vital source and authority of the nautical and maritime history of engine-powered vessels, from the earliest steam-powered ships to modern ocean liners.

P.O. Box 100
Somerset, MA 02726-0100
(800) 223-5535
Email: tcs@destroyers.org
James V. Jones, Captain, USN (Ret), President
Terry L. Miller, Executive Director
tcs@destroyers.org
http://www.destroyers.org

Tin Can Sailors was founded in 1976. We now have thousands of members. Tin Can Sailors has three basic purposes:

1) Serve Destroyer Veterans through our newspaper, events, ship’s store, free admissions, etc.
2) Support Historic Fleet through our Destroyer Museum Grant Program and w/volunteer labor.
3) Support Active Fleet through free distribution of our newspaper/contributions to Navy Relief.

Tin Can Sailors is a non-profit, tax-exempt organization. We are recognized by the Internal Revenue Service under Section 501(c)(3). Contributions to Tin Can Sailors may be tax deductible as allowed by law. Tin Can Sailors files annual reports (Form 990) with the Internal Revenue Service and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Attorney General’s Division of Public Charities.

Our newspaper, The Tin Can Sailor, is published four times a year. We do not accept outside advertising. We do not sell our mailing list nor do we make our mailing list available to other organizations. The newspaper is sent to all members of Tin Can Sailors. Free copies are also sent to all active Destroyers and Frigates and to destroyer veterans who cannot afford to send money but who have asked to receive the newspaper.

Tin Can Sailors makes grants to seven historic ships. All of those ships are operated by 501(c)(3) educational/charitable organizations. See our Grant Program page for more information.

1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20590-0001
(202) 366-0866
FAX (202) 366-5904
Ms. Barbara Voulgaris, Program Historian & Federal Preservation Officer
Office of Ship Operations
Barbara.Voulgaris@dot.gov
http://www.marad.dot.gov/

This agency of the U.S. federal government administers the inactive ships in various reserve fleets and maritime artifacts. They are also the owners of NS Savannah, the only nuclear powered merchant vessel built by the USA.

Mission: To improve and strengthen the U.S. Marine Transportation System to meet the economic, environmental and security needs of the Nation.  In our work across the government and the industry we support and advocate advancements in the business of shipping and marine transportation, both domestically and internationally.

Washington Navy Yard
805 Kidder Breese St., SE
Washington Navy Yard, DC 20374-5060
(202) 433-2210; Fax: (202) 433-3593
RADM Samuel Cox, USN (Ret.), Director and Curator of the Navy
Samuel.cox@navy.mil
https://www.history.navy.mil

Mission: Collect, preserve, protect, present, and make relevant the artifacts, art, and documents that best capture the Navy’s history and heritage.

Vision: Make the Navy and its history relevant to the American people and their leaders.

Provide the knowledge foundation for the Navy by maintaining historically relevant resources and products that identify what the Navy is and what it stands for.

Overview: The Naval History and Heritage Command traces its lineage to 1800 when President John Adams asked Benjamin Stoddert, the first Secretary of the Navy, to prepare a catalog of professional books for the secretary’s office. Today, the NHHC is the central resource for today’s operational Navy and acts as the services institutional memory.

Headquartered on the historic Washington Navy Yard, D.C., the Command includes ten official Navy museums nationwide as well as a detachment that maintains the Navy’s oldest commissioned warship, USS Constitution, in Boston, Mass.

The NHHC manages the official history program of the United States Navy, fulfilling its mission to strengthen the Navy’s effectiveness by preserving, analyzing, and interpreting the service’s hard-earned experience. A professional staff of historians, archivists, librarians, museum specialists, and naval personnel carries out historical activities and supports the fleet.

The Command oversees Navy programs and instructions related to history; advances knowledge of naval history and heritage through professional research, analysis, and interpretation, delivering a range of knowledge products and services; advises the Navy, other agencies, and the public on issues related to Navy ship and aircraft wrecks; and administers grants, fellowships, scholarships, and internships related to naval history.

Archives Branch—Operational Records and Personal Papers
Bldg. 108, 3rd Floor
202.433.3224
archives@navy.mil

Archives Branch—Ship and Aviation Unit Records
Bldg. 200, 1st Floor
202.433.3224
archives@navy.mil

Archives Branch—Photographic Section
Bldg. 108, 2nd Floor
202.433.2765
nhhcphotoarchives@navy.mil

Curator Branch
Bldg. 108, 2nd Floor
202.433.7873 or 202.433.2220
nhhccurator@navy.mil

Navy Department Library
Reference 433.7833; Circulation 433.4132

Underwater Archaeology
Bldg. 70, 1st Floor
nhhcunderwaterarchaeology@navy.mil

Navy Art Collection
Bldg. 67 (office)
202.433.3815
navyart@navy.mil
Gail Munro, Branch Head: gail.munro@navy.mil

USS Constitution “Old Ironsides,” Boston, Massachusetts

 

U.S. Naval Museums:
Great Lakes Naval Museum, Naval Station Great Lakes, IL  http://www.history.navy.mil/glnm
Hampton Roads Naval Museum, Norfolk, VA  http://www.hrnm.navy.mil/
National Museum of Naval Aviation, Pensacola, FL  http://www.navalaviationmuseum.org/Naval Museum of Armament and Technology, China Lake, CA  http://www.chinalakemuseum.org/
Naval Undersea Museum, Keyport, WA
Naval War College Museum, Newport, RI  http://www.usnwc.edu/About/NWC-Museum.aspx
Patuxtent River Naval Air Museum, Patuxtent River, MD  http://paxmuseum.com/
Seabee Museum, Port Hueneme, CA   http://www.seabeehf.org/museum/
Submarine Force Museum & Historic Ship Nautilus, Groton, CT
U.S. Naval Academy Museum, Annapolis, MD   http://www.usna.edu/Museum/
National Museum of the United States Navy, Washington, D.C.

291 Wood Road
Annapolis, MD 21402
(410) 268-6110
Email: phdaly@usni.org
VADM Peter H. Daly, USN (Ret.)
http://www.usni.org

The U.S. Naval Institute is a voluntary, private, nonprofit association for the advancement of professional, literary, and scientific knowledge in the naval and maritime services, and the advancement of the knowledge of sea power.

Mission: To provide an independent forum for those who dare to read, think, speak, and write in order to advance the professional, literary, and scientific understanding of sea power and other issues critical to national defense

Vision:  We are the preeminent thought leader serving all Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard personnel by advancing the naval profession and preserving our naval history. USNI enhances the understanding of the vital contribution of American sea power to the defense and economic well-being of our nation.

Ship Donation Program Office (PMS 333B)
1333 Isaac Hull Avenue, S.E., Stop 2701
Washington Navy Yard, DC 20376-2701
(202) 781-0498
Fax: (202) 781-4721
Email: christina.wenderoth@navy.mil
Christina Wenderoth, Donation Manager
http://www.navsea.navy.mil/teamships/Inactiveships/default.aspx

This office manages the donation of U.S. Navy ships at no cost to the Government in accordance with federal statute Title 10 U.S.C. 7306. It also manages a material donation program and an inspection program for the donation ships.

The Navy Inactive Ships Office (SEA 21I) manages U.S. Navy ships and craft that have reached the natural end of their lifecycle. (SEA 21I) is responsible for the planning, programming, budgeting, and execution of the Navy’s inactivation and disposal of conventionally powered surface ships and craft.

Objectives:
Supporting the Fleet with responsive services for inactivation and equipment/material recovery
Equipment Removal System Process for Navy item/inventory managers
Reducing the inactive ship inventory using all tools available in a cost-effective manner
Maintaining compliance with environmental and occupational safety regulations
Continuing improvement toward cost efficiencies

Mission Statement:
The Navy Inactive Ships Office commits to:
Work with International Fleet Support Office (PMS 326) to transfer assets to friendly foreign navies
Transition ships from the Fleet for storage and disposal
Preserve our naval heritage through ship donations
Enhance marine ecosystems through artificial reefing
Protect the environment through ship dismantling and recycling

Accomplishments:  The Navy has successfully reduced its inventory of inactive conventionally-powered ships from nearly 200 in 1997 to approximately 50 today.