Shipyard Outside Machinist

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Shipyard Outside Machinist, Bulletin 345-K, 1942, was created during the peak of the massive shipbuilding campaign of WW II. During the war a large number of workers were trained in new trades to meet the increased demand for new labor. This was one of the courses created to prepare those new workers.

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Image of the the cover. A suggested Unit Course SHIPYARD OUTSIDE MACHINIST (For Beginning and Advanced Instruction) Bulletin 345-K Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction Harrisburg 1942


Vocational Training
for
War Production Workers


Boring a Stern Frame Rudder Gudgeon
Boring a Stern Frame Rudder Gudgeon

 A suggested Unit Course SHIPYARD OUTSIDE MACHINIST
(For Beginning and Advanced Instruction)Bulletin 345-K

Prepared by the
COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

In Cooperation With

SUN SHIPBUILDING AND DRY DOCK COMPANY
CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PHILADELPHIA

SCHOOL DISTRICT, CITY OF CHESTER

and

UNITED STATES OFFICE OF EDUCATION
FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
Harrisburg
1942

 


 

This Material Was Prepared
In Cooperation With The
United States Office of Education
The Federal Security Agency
Washington, D. C.

Forward

The rapid expansion of shipbuilding, with an accompanying increase in the number of shipyard outside machinists to be trained, has prompted the development and publication of this manual of instruction.

The procedures presented here are specifically those which are followed in the yard of the Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company. Persons who have developed this material realize that certain procedures may not be applicable to all types of shipyards.

Much of the information presented, however, is standard practice which will be useful in training shipyard outside machinists for most shipyards. Through the courtesy of the Alabama State Department of Education, certain items of instructional material have been selected from their training course for Shipyard Outside Machinists and adapted to fit local requirements.

Acknowledgment is made to the Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Chester, Pennsylvania, and to foremen, mechanics, and draftsmen employed by the Sun Yard for assistance and cooperation in making the preliminary analysis and in preparing instruction materials.

Special acknowledgment is extended to George Ehaugh, General Foreman of Installation Machinists; to William Evans, Foreman of Installation Machinists; and to E. G. Lamberson, Foreman of the Tube Mill. These men assisted materially in the preparation of text matter, sketches, and photographs; they served also in the capacity of technical advisers. The assistance of George Amrhein, E. L. Moritz, G. E. Marvel, J. W. Randall, James Galway, Joseph Kehl, and Ralph Garman, Leaders of Installation Machinists, is gratefully acknowledged.

Appreciation is extended to the Philadelphia School District; to the Chester School District; to D. Francis Hallowell, Coordinator of Chester Area Defense Training Program; and to William A. Brock, Area Coordinator of Industrial Education, for assistance in this work.

Acknowledgment is also extended to the Cramp Shipyard, Philadelphia, and to J. J. Campbell, Outside Machinist Instructor, Mastbaum Vocational School Annex, Philadelphia, for assistance in the preparation of suggested types of training jobs in correlation with instruction sheets contained in this manual.

This manual of instruction was prepared by the Chester Field Curriculum Laboratory of the Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction, under the immediate supervision of Charles Johnston, Adviser, Division of Industrial Education. The work was completed under the direction of Charles F. Zinn, Adviser, Division of Industrial Education, and under the general supervision of Paul L. Cressman, Director, Bureau of Instruction, and Urwin Rowntree, Chief, Division of Industrial Education.

 

October, 1942FRANCIS B. HAAS
Superintendent of Public Instruction

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Introduction

DUTIES OF A SHIPYARD OUTSIDE MACHINIST

Shipyard outside machinists are required to make certain installations, above and below deck, throughout the ship. The equipment to be installed is fabricated in various departments of the shipyard or purchased from approved manufacturers.

The work of the outside machinist may start when the hull begins to take shape, depending altogether on the circumstances which govern the fabrication of units built in the shipyard, the speed of hull construction, and the availability of purchased units. In some cases the work of the outside machinist is 75% completed before the ship leaves the ways. At other times the greater part of the work is not started until the ship is launched.

APPLICATION OF THE MANUAL

The manual Shipyard Outside Machinist may be applied to the training of the beginning workers, advanced workers, and maintenance and repair outside machinists. It is designed principally for the guidance of shipyard outside machinists, that is, those machinists whose work is done around the wet basins and on the ways. Many of the processes and operations presented are also applicable to shop machinist’s training problems. This outline is specifically intended for training outside machinists (Marine); it is not intended for instruction of general shipyard shop machinists.


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CONTENTSPART I
OUTSIDE MACHINIST TRAINING FOR BEGINNERS 

INTRODUCTION
Safety3
Location of Shops, Ways, etc., in the Yard6
Tools and Equipment:
  (a) Tool Kit Owned by the Outside Machinist7
  (b) Tool Crib: Tools Found in Tool Crib, Usually Company Owned8
GENERAL ARRANGEMENT OF A SHIP
Plan and Elevation, Ship Terms, and Locations9
CORRECT USE OF TOOLS AND
GENERAL WORK FOR THE NEW MAN
Mechanics’ Scale and Steel Tape12
Calipers, Dividers, and Hermaphrodites23
Reading the Micrometer28
Machinists’ Hammer and Center Punch36
Cold Chisels: Types and Uses38
Open End Wrenches40
Drills and Drilling41
Reamers and Reaming47
Reaming “Through” Holes50
Using a Portable Air Drill with Ratchet and “Old Man”55
Threading Bolts and Nuts (Tapping Holes)60
Tightening a Stud in a Threaded Hole65
Removing Studs or Broken Bolts67
Screw Driver69
Files70
Fitting a Key74
General Discussion of Other Outside Machinists’ Tools Listed in Part I75
PART II
OUTSIDE MACHINIST TRAINING
ADVANCED WORK AND MAINTENANCE
Using a Portable Grinder91
Fitting Chocks92
Using Gasket Material and Thread Dope97
Making a Full Face Gasket100
Making a Ring Gasket for a Standard Six-inch Flange Joint101
Cutting a Dovetail Gasket102
Making and Installing a Grommet104
Packing a Stuffing Box105
Making a Watertight Joint108

Overhauling a Valve109
Grinding Valve Seats113
Setting a Valve117
Using a Declivity Board and Level.119
Striking a Chalk Line122
Setting and Fitting a Deck Stand125
Installing a Pump128
Lining Up Pumps and Motors130
Aligning a Coupling132
Overhauling a Pump136
Spotting and Scraping Bearings147
Installing Operating Rods153
Fitting a Sea Chest Strainer Plate158
Installing Main Suction Valve161
Installing Overboard Spools163
PART III
ADVANCED OUTSIDE MACHINIST TRAINING
INSTALLATIONS, MAINTENANCE, REPAIRS
Running a Tight Line171
Removing a Tight Line178
Setting a Portable Boring Bar179
Boring a Stern Frame184
“Pulling-In” a Stern Tube188
Installing a Propulsion Motor193
Installing Fan and Motor for Air Cooler198
Installing a Steam Boiler201
Installing Winches209
Installing a Steering Gear, and Telemotor for Pilot House Indication223
Installing a Propeller and Tail Shaft246
Launching a Tanker250
APPENDIX I
Typical Drawings that Outside Machinists Must be Able to Read255
APPENDIX II
Shipyard Outside Machinist Terms and Definitions279
APPENDIX III
Abbreviations Used by Shipbuilders293
APPENDIX IV
Dimensions of Standard Iron and Steel Pipe295
APPENDIX V
Using the Sag Table296
Index299